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Anne Baxter

Best known for her Oscar nominated role in All About Eve and her Oscar winning role in The Razor’s Edge.

ANNE BAXTER

Filmography

1940      

20 Mule Team

The Great Profile

 

1941      

Charley’s Aunt

Swamp Water

 

1942      

The Pied Piper

The Magnificent Ambersons

 

1943      

Crash Dive

Five Graves to Cairo

The North Star

 

1944      

The Fighting Sullivans

The Eve of St. Mark

Sunday Dinner for a Soldier

Guest in the House

The Purple Heart

 

1945      

A Royal Scandal

 

1946      

Smoky

Angel on My Shoulder

The Razor’s Edge

 

1947      

Blaze of Noon

Mother Wore Tights

 

1948

Homecoming

The Walls of Jericho

The Luck of the Irish

Yellow Sky

 

1949      

You’re My Everything

 

1950      

A Ticket to Tomahawk

All About Eve

 

1951      

Follow the Sun

 

1952      

The Outcasts of Poker Flat

O Henry’s Full House

 

1952      

My Wife’s Best Friend

 

1953      

I Confess

The Blue Gardenia

 

1954      

Carnival Story

 

1955      

Bedevilled

One Desire

The Spoilers

 

1956      

The Come On

The Ten Commandments

 

1957      

Three Violent People

 

1958      

Chase a Crooked Shadow

 

1959      

Summer of the Seventeenth Doll

 

1960      

Cimarron

 

1962      

Mix Me a Person

Walk on the Wild Side

 

1965      

The Family Jewels

 

1966      

Seven Vengeful Women

 

1967      

The Busy Body

 

1971      

Fools’ Parade

The Late Liz

 

1980      

Jane Austen in Manhattan

Awards

Anne Baxter was nominated for two Academy Awards and won one.

Acting is not what I do. It’s what I am. It’s my permanent, built-in cathedral. ~ Anne Baxter

Anne Baxter was born May 7, 1923 in Michigan City, Indiana, to Catherine Dorothy (née Wright; 1894–1979)—whose father was the famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright—and Kenneth Stuart Baxter (1893–1977), an executive with the Seagrams Distillery Company. When Baxter was five, she appeared in a school play and, as her family had moved to New York when she was six years old, Baxter continued to act. She was raised in Westchester County, New York and attended Brearley. At age 10, Baxter attended a Broadway play starring Helen Hayes, and was so impressed that she declared to her family that she wanted to become an actress. By the age of 13, she had appeared on Broadway in Seen but Not Heard. During this period, Baxter learned her acting craft as a student of the famed teacher Maria Ouspenskaya. In 1939 she was cast as Katherine Hepburn’s little sister in the play The Philadelphia Story, but Hepburn did not like Baxter’s acting style and she was replaced during the show’s pre-Broadway run. Rather than giving up, she turned to Hollywood.

At 16, Baxter screen-tested for the role of Mrs. DeWinter in Rebecca, losing to Joan Fontaine because director Alfred Hitchcock deemed Baxter too young for the role, but she soon secured a seven-year contract with 20th Century Fox. In 1940, she was loaned out to MGM for her first film, 20 Mule Team, in which she was billed fourth after Wallace Beery, Leo Carrillo, and Marjorie Rambeau. She worked with John Barrymore in her next film, The Great Profile (1940), and appeared as the ingénue in the Jack Benny vehicle Charley’s Aunt (1941). She received star billing in Swamp Water (1941) and The Pied Piper (1942), which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Baxter was loaned out to RKO to appear in director Orson Welles’ The Magnificent Ambersons (1942). She was Tyrone Power’s leading lady in her first Technicolor film, Crash Dive (1943). In 1943, she played a French maid in a North African hotel (with a credible French accent) in Billy Wilder’s Five Graves to Cairo, a Paramount production. She became a popular star in World War II dramas and received top billing in The North Star (1943), The Sullivans (1944), The Eve of St. Mark (1944), and Sunday Dinner for a Soldier (1944), co-starring her future husband, John Hodiak. Baxter later recalled, “I was getting almost as much mail as Betty Grable. I was our boys’ ide