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The decade of the 1980s in cinema saw the return of studio-driven pictures, coming from the filmmaker-driven New Hollywood era of the 1970s. The period was when “high concept” films gained popularity, where movies were to be easily marketable and understandable, and, therefore, they had short cinematic plots that could be summarized in one or two sentences. The modern Hollywood blockbuster is the most popular film format from the 1980s. Producer Don Simpson is usually credited with the creation of the high-concept picture of the modern Hollywood blockbuster.

The decade also saw an increased amount of nudity in film and the increasing emphasis in the American industry on film franchises, especially in the science fiction, horror and action genres. Much of the reliance on these effect-driven blockbusters was due in part to the Star Wars films at the advent of this decade and the new cinematic effects it helped to pioneer. The teen comedy sub-genre also rose in popularity during this decade.

In the US, the PG-13 rating was introduced in 1984 to accommodate films that straddled the line between PG and R, which was mainly due to the controversies surrounding the violent content of the PG films Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Gremlins (both 1984).

Some have considered the 1980s in retrospect as one of the weaker decades for American cinema in terms of the quality of the films released. Quentin Tarantino (director of Pulp Fiction) has voiced his own view that the 1980s was one of the worst eras for American films. Film critic Kent Jones also shares this opinion. However, film theorist David Bordwell countered this notion, saying that the “megapicture mentality” was already existent in the 1970s, which is evident in the ten highest-grossing films of that decade, as well as with how many of the filmmakers part of New Hollywood were still able to direct many great pictures in the 1980s (Martin Scorsese, Brian de Palma, etc.)

Ordinary People

© 1980 – Paramount Pictures. All rights reserved.

53rd Academy Awards

The 53rd Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1980, were presented March 31, 1981, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. The ceremonies, which were presided over by Johnny Carson, were originally scheduled for the previous day but were postponed due to the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan.

David Lynch’s The Elephant Man and Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull, with eight nominations each, had the most nominations of this year’s films. Their nominations included Best Picture, Best Actor and Best Director. Michael Apted’s Coal Miner’s Daughter received seven nominations while Ordinary People and Tess received six.

The year’s winner of acting categories also marked as the closest span ever between the four winners, all of whom were under 40 when they won the award. Robert De Niro was 37 when awarded Best Actor, Sissy Spacek was 31 when awarded Best Actress, Timothy Hutton was 20 when awarded Best Supporting Actor, and Mary Steenburgen was 28 when awarded Best Supporting Actress. In addition, Hutton was the youngest ever Best Supporting Actor winner. His award was one of four that Ordinary People won, more than any other movie; the movie also won Best Picture, Best Director for Robert Redford and Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for Alvin Sargent.

The lack of recognition for Christopher Tucker’s make-up work on The Elephant Man prompted the creation of the Academy Award for Best Makeup the following year.

Best Supporting Actress nominee Eva Le Gallienne was born in 1899, which made her the last acting nominee to be born in the nineteenth century. As of 2017, this is the earliest Oscars for which all five directing nominees are still living.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Robert De NiroRaging Bull {“Jake LaMotta”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Timothy HuttonOrdinary People {“Conrad Jarrett”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Sissy Spacek — Coal Miner’s Daughter {“Loretta Lynn”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Mary Steenburgen — Melvin and Howard {“Lynda Dummar”}

ART DIRECTION Tess — Art Direction: Pierre Guffroy, Jack Stephens

CINEMATOGRAPHY Tess — Geoffrey Unsworth, Ghislain Cloquet

COSTUME DESIGN Tess — Anthony Powell

DIRECTING Ordinary PeopleRobert Redford

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) From Mao to Mozart: Isaac Stern in China — Murray Lerner, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Karl Hess: Toward Liberty — Roland Hallé and Peter W. Ladue, Producers

FILM EDITING Raging Bull — Thelma Schoonmaker

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears — Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

MUSIC (Original Score) Fame — Michael Gore

MUSIC (Original Song) “Fame” from Fame — Music by Michael Gore; Lyric by Dean Pitchford

BEST PICTURE Ordinary People — Ronald L. Schwary, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) The Fly — Ferenc Rofusz, Producer

SHORT FILM (Dramatic Live Action) The Dollar Bottom — Lloyd Phillips, Producer

SOUND The Empire Strikes Back — Bill Varney, Steve Maslow, Gregg Landaker, Peter Sutton

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Ordinary People — Alvin Sargent

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Melvin and Howard — Bo Goldman

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (Visual Effects) The Empire Strikes Back — Brian Johnson, Richard Edlund, Dennis Muren, Bruce Nicholson

HONORARY AWARD

To Henry Fonda, the consummate actor, in recognition of his brilliant accomplishments and enduring contribution to the art of motion pictures.

 

Chariots of Fire

© 1981 Warner Bros.

54th Academy Awards

The 54th Academy Awards were presented March 29, 1982, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Johnny Carson.

Chariots of Fire was the surprise winner (with a leading 12 nominations, Reds had been expected to win) of the Best Picture Oscar. It was the first time in 13 years that a British film won the Academy’s top honor. The next year’s winner, Gandhi, was also a British production.

Henry Fonda won his only competitive Oscar this year, as Best Actor for On Golden Pond. At 76 years of age, Fonda became the oldest winner in the Best Actor category in Academy history. The only other nomination he received in his career was Best Actor for his performance in The Grapes of Wrath 41 years earlier – a record gap between acting nominations. His co-star, Katharine Hepburn, won her fourth Best Actress award, extending her own record for the most Best Actress wins by any actress.

This year’s nominations also marked the second time (after 1967) that three different films were nominated for the “Big Five” Academy Awards: Best Picture, Director, Actor, Actress and Screenplay. The three films were On Golden Pond, Atlantic City and Reds. However, none of them won the Best Picture prize, losing to Chariots of Fire. This also marked the first year that the award for Best Makeup was presented; the winner was Rick Baker for his work on An American Werewolf in London.

This was the last year until the 2005 Oscars where all five Best Picture nominations were also nominated for Best Director. Reds was the last film to gain nominations in all four acting categories until Silver Linings Playbook matched that feat at the 85th Academy Awards ceremony in 2013. Facilitated in part by their advanced ages at the time (77, 76, 74 and a “young” 56), this is also the most recent ceremony (as of the 2017 presentation of the 89th Academy Awards) for which the four acting award winners are all now deceased – though two of the four did live into their late 90s.

Chariots of Fire became the last film to win Best Picture and not win for directing until Driving Miss Daisy in 1990.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Henry FondaOn Golden Pond {“Norman Thayer, Jr.”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE John Gielgud – Arthur {“Hobson”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Katharine HepburnOn Golden Pond {“Ethel Thayer”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Maureen Stapleton – Reds {“Emma Goldman”}

ART DIRECTION Raiders of the Lost Ark — Art Direction: Norman Reynolds, Leslie Dilley; Set Decoration: Michael Ford

CINEMATOGRAPHY Reds — Vittorio Storaro

COSTUME DESIGN Chariots of Fire — Milena Canonero

DIRECTING Reds — Warren Beatty

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Genocide — Arnold Schwartzman and Rabbi Marvin Hier, Producers

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Close Harmony — Nigel Noble, Producer

FILM EDITING Raiders of the Lost Ark — Michael Kahn

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Mephisto — Hungary

MAKEUP An American Werewolf in London — Rick Baker

MUSIC (Original Score) Chariots of Fire — Vangelis

MUSIC (Original Song) “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” from Arthur — Music and Lyric by Burt Bacharach, Carole Bayer Sager, Christopher Cross and Peter Allen

BEST PICTURE Chariots of Fire — David Puttnam, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) Crac — Frédéric Back, Producer

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Violet — Paul Kemp and Shelley Levinson, Producers

SOUND Raiders of the Lost Ark — Bill Varney, Steve Maslow, Gregg Landaker, Roy Charman

VISUAL EFFECTS Raiders of the Lost Ark — Richard Edlund, Kit West, Bruce Nicholson, Joe Johnston

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) On Golden Pond — Ernest Thompson

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Chariots of Fire — Colin Welland

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (Sound Effects Editing) Raiders of the Lost Ark — Ben Burtt, Richard L. Anderson

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Danny Kaye

HONORARY AWARD

To Barbara Stanwyck for superlative creativity and unique contribution to the art of screen acting.

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Albert R. Broccoli

 

Gandhi

 

55th Academy Awards

The 55th Academy Awards were presented April 11, 1983, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Liza Minnelli, Dudley Moore, Richard Pryor, and Walter Matthau. The awards were dominated by the Best Picture winner Gandhi, which won eight awards out of its eleven nominations.

Louis Gossett Jr. became the first black actor to win Best Supporting Actor for his performance as the tough and principled drill sergeant Emil Foley in An Officer and a Gentleman.

Meryl Streep won her first Best Actress award. She had been nominated the year before for The French Lieutenant’s Woman and would be nominated another thirteen times in the next thirty years. Streep had previously won the Best Supporting Actress award in 1979 for Kramer vs Kramer.

This marked the first of 28 consecutive years where a Barbara Walters interview special aired before the ceremony. Walters had previously aired an interview special in 1981 and in subsequent years, her special aired prior to the Academy’s formal broadcast of celebrities walking the red carpet.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Ben KingsleyGandhi {“Mahatma Gandhi”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Louis Gossett, Jr.An Officer and a Gentleman {“Sgt. Emil Foley”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Meryl Streep — Sophie’s Choice {“Sophie”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Jessica Lange – Tootsie {“Julie Nichols”}

ART DIRECTION Gandhi — Art Direction: Stuart Craig, Bob Laing; Set Decoration: Michael Seirton

CINEMATOGRAPHY Gandhi — Billy Williams, Ronnie Taylor

COSTUME DESIGN Gandhi — John Mollo, Bhanu Athaiya

DIRECTING Gandhi — Richard Attenborough

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Just Another Missing Kid — John Zaritsky, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) If You Love This Planet — Edward Le Lorrain and Terri Nash, Producers

FILM EDITING Gandhi — John Bloom

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Volver a Empezar (‘To Begin Again’) — Spain

MAKEUP Quest for Fire — Sarah Monzani, Michèle Burke

MUSIC (Original Score) E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — John Williams

MUSIC (Original Song Score and Its Adaptation -or- Adaptation Score) Victor/Victoria — Song Score by Henry Mancini and Leslie Bricusse; Adaptation Score by Henry Mancini

MUSIC (Original Song) “Up Where We Belong” from An Officer and a Gentleman — Music by Jack Nitzsche and Buffy Sainte-Marie; Lyric by Will Jennings

BEST PICTURE Gandhi — Richard Attenborough, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) Tango — Zbigniew Rybczynski, Producer

SHORT FILM (Live Action) A Shocking Accident — Christine Oestreicher, Producer

SOUND E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — Robert Knudson, Robert Glass, Don Digirolamo, Gene Cantamessa

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — Charles L. Campbell, Ben Burtt

VISUAL EFFECTS E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — Carlo Rambaldi, Dennis Muren, Kenneth F. Smith

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Missing — Costa-Gavras, Donald Stewart

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Gandhi — John Briley

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Walter Mirisch

HONORARY AWARD

To Mickey Rooney, in recognition of his 60 years of versatility in a variety of memorable film performances.

 

Terms of Endearment

Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images – © 2012 Getty Images

 

56th Academy Awards

The 56th Academy Awards were presented April 9, 1984, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Johnny Carson.

The Best Supporting Actress winner this year was unique. 4’9” Linda Hunt won the award for her role as Billy Kwan – a male Chinese-Australian photographer – in Peter Weir’s The Year of Living Dangerously, making her the first actor to win an Oscar for playing a character of the opposite sex.

Gordon Willis, a respected cinematographer most famous for his un-nominated work on The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, and Woody Allen’s Manhattan, received his first Best Cinematography nomination for Zelig.

Joe I. Tompkins becomes the first black person to be nominated in Best Costume Design.

James L. Brooks won three Academy Awards this year, winning as producer, director and writer of Best Picture winner Terms of Endearment. Of its other eight nominations (the movie led all nominees with 11), two were for Best Actress; Shirley MacLaine won over Debra Winger in that category. The movie won five Oscars, the fifth being Jack Nicholson’s second career Oscar (he won for Best Supporting Actor).

This ceremony ended with Sammy Davis Jr. and Liza Minnelli leading the crowd in “There’s No Business Like Show Business” in tribute to Ethel Merman, who had died a month and a half before this Oscar ceremony. The performance occurred over the closing credits to the broadcast.

The Award for Best Makeup was not given this year.

While this year’s ceremony was the first without the recitation of the Academy’s voting procedure at the beginning of the telecast — it was moved to the end credits — those of the accounting firm Price Waterhouse who were responsible for tabulating the results and guarding their secrecy were still introduced.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Robert Duvall — Tender Mercies {“Mac Sledge”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Jack NicholsonTerms of Endearment {“Garrett Breedlove”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Shirley MacLaineTerms of Endearment {“Aurora Greenway”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Linda Hunt — The Year of Living Dangerously {“Billy Kwan”}

ART DIRECTION Fanny & Alexander — Anna Asp

CINEMATOGRAPHY Fanny & Alexander — Sven Nykvist

COSTUME DESIGN Fanny & Alexander — Marik Vos

DIRECTING Terms of Endearment — James L. Brooks

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) He Makes Me Feel Like Dancin’ — Emile Ardolino, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Flamenco at 5:15 — Cynthia Scott and Adam Symansky, Producers

FILM EDITING The Right Stuff — Glenn Farr, Lisa Fruchtman, Stephen A. Rotter, Douglas Stewart, Tom Rolf

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Fanny & Alexander — Sweden

MUSIC (Original Score) The Right Stuff — Bill Conti

MUSIC (Original Song Score or Adaptation Score) Yentl — Song Score by Michel Legrand, Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman

MUSIC (Original Song) “Flashdance…What A Feeling” from Flashdance — Music by Giorgio Moroder; Lyric by Keith Forsey and Irene Cara

BEST PICTURE Terms of Endearment — James L. Brooks, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) Sundae in New York — Jimmy Picker, Producer

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Boys and Girls — Janice L. Platt, Producer

SOUND The Right Stuff — Mark Berger, Tom Scott, Randy Thom, David MacMillan

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING The Right Stuff — Jay Boekelheide

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Terms of Endearment — James L. Brooks

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Tender Mercies — Horton Foote

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (Visual Effects) Return of the Jedi — Richard Edlund, Dennis Muren, Ken Ralston, Phil Tippett

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

M. J. Frankovich

HONORARY AWARD

To Hal Roach, in recognition of his unparalleled record of distinguished contributions to the motion picture art form.

 

Amadeus

 

57th Academy Awards

The 57th Academy Awards were presented March 25, 1985, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. Jack Lemmon presided over the ceremonies.

Upon winning the Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in Places in the Heart, Sally Field exclaimed, “The first time I didn’t feel it, but this time I feel it, and I can’t deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!” (often misquoted as “you really like me!”)

The big winner at the ceremony was Milos Forman’s Amadeus, which had received 11 nominations and won 8 awards including Best Picture and Best Actor for F. Murray Abraham. As of the 87th Academy Awards, Amadeus is the most recent film to receive two lead actor nominations.

The winner of Best Supporting Actor was also significant. Haing S. Ngor, a Cambodian surgeon who survived the horrors of the Khmer Rouge, won the award for his performance as Dith Pran in Roland Joffé’s The Killing Fields, despite having had no previous acting experience. Ngor and Harold Russell are the only two non-professional actors to win Academy Awards for acting.

Seventy-seven-year-old Peggy Ashcroft won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in A Passage to India, making her the oldest winner in that category.

This ceremony marked the first time that multiple black nominees would win an Oscar, when Prince and Stevie Wonder won for their respective work on Purple Rain and The Woman in Red. Additionally, it was the first and only time that all five nominated songs topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE F. Murray AbrahamAmadeus {“Antonio Salieri”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Haing S. Ngor — The Killing Fields {“Dith Pran”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Sally FieldPlaces in the Heart {“Edna Spalding”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Peggy Ashcroft — A Passage to India {“Mrs. Moore”}

ART DIRECTION Amadeus — Art Direction: Patrizia Von Brandenstein; Set Decoration: Karel Cerny

CINEMATOGRAPHY The Killing Fields — Chris Menges

COSTUME DESIGN Amadeus — Theodor Pistek

DIRECTING Amadeus — Milos Forman

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) The Times of Harvey Milk — Robert Epstein and Richard Schmiechen, Producers

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) The Stone Carvers — Marjorie Hunt and Paul Wagner, Producers

FILM EDITING The Killing Fields — Jim Clark

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Dangerous Moves — Switzerland

MAKEUP Amadeus — Paul LeBlanc, Dick Smith

MUSIC (Original Score) A Passage to India — Maurice Jarre

MUSIC (Original Song Score) Purple Rain — Prince

MUSIC (Original Song) “I Just Called To Say I Love You” from The Woman in Red — Music and Lyric by Stevie Wonder

BEST PICTURE Amadeus — Saul Zaentz, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) Charade — Jon Minnis, Producer

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Up — Mike Hoover, Producer

SOUND Amadeus — Mark Berger, Tom Scott, Todd Boekelheide, Chris Newman

VISUAL EFFECTS Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom — Dennis Muren, Michael McAlister, Lorne Peterson, George Gibbs

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Amadeus — Peter Shaffer

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Places in the Heart — Robert Benton

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (Sound Effects Editing) The River — Kay Rose

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

David L. Wolper

HONORARY AWARD

To James Stewart, for his fifty years of memorable performances. For his high ideals both on and off the screen. With the respect and affection of his colleagues.

To the National Endowment for the Arts, in recognition of its 20th anniversary and its dedicated commitment to fostering artistic and creative activity and excellence in every area of the arts.

 

Out of Africa

 

58th Academy Awards

The 58th Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), took place on March 24, 1986, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Actors Alan Alda, Jane Fonda, and Robin Williams co-hosted the show. Fonda hosted the gala for the second time, having previously been a co-host of the 49th ceremony held in 1977. Meanwhile, this was Alda and Williams’s first Oscars hosting stint.

Out of Africa won seven awards including Best Picture. Other winners included Cocoon and Witness with two awards, and Kiss of the Spider Woman, The Trip to Bountiful, Prizzi’s Honor, The Official Story, Broken Rainbow, Witness to War: Dr. Charlie Clements, Molly’s Pilgrim, Anna & Bella, White Nights, Back to the Future, Mask and Ran with one.

Winner

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE William Hurt — Kiss of the Spider Woman {“Luis Molina”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Don Ameche – Cocoon {“Art Selwyn”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Geraldine Page — The Trip to Bountiful {“Mrs. Watts”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Anjelica Huston — Prizzi’s Honor {“Maerose Prizzi”}

ART DIRECTION Out of Africa — Art Direction: Stephen Grimes; Set Decoration: Josie MacAvin

CINEMATOGRAPHY Out of Africa — David Watkin

COSTUME DESIGN Ran — Emi Wada

DIRECTING Out of Africa — Sydney Pollack

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Broken Rainbow — Maria Florio and Victoria Mudd, Producers

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Witness to War: Dr. Charlie Clements — David Goodman, Producer

FILM EDITING Witness — Thom Noble

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM The Official Story — Argentina

MAKEUP Mask — Michael Westmore, Zoltan Elek

MUSIC (Original Score) Out of Africa — John Barry

MUSIC (Original Song) “Say You, Say Me” from White Nights — Music and Lyric by Lionel Richie

BEST PICTURE Out of Africa — Sydney Pollack, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) Anna & Bella — Cilia Van Dijk, Producer

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Molly’s Pilgrim — Jeff Brown and Chris Pelzer, Producers

SOUND Out of Africa — Chris Jenkins, Gary Alexander, Larry Stensvold, Peter Handford

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING Back to the Future — Charles L. Campbell, Robert Rutledge

VISUAL EFFECTS Cocoon — Ken Ralston, Ralph McQuarrie, Scott Farrar, David Berry

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Out of Africa — Kurt Luedtke

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Witness — Screenplay by Earl W. Wallace, William Kelley; Story by William Kelley, Pamela Wallace, Earl W. Wallace

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers

HONORARY AWARD

To Paul Newman, in recognition of his many and memorable compelling screen performances and for his personal integrity and dedication to his craft.

To Alex North, in recognition of his brilliant artistry in the creation of memorable music for a host of distinguished motion pictures.

 

platoon

© 1986 – MGM, Inc.

 

59th Academy Awards

The 59th Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), took place on March 30, 1987, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Actors Chevy Chase, Paul Hogan, and Goldie Hawn co-hosted the show. Hawn hosted the gala for the second time, having previously been a co-host of the 48th ceremony held in 1976. Meanwhile, this was Chase and Hogan’s first Oscars hosting stint.

Platoon won four awards including Best Picture. Other winners included Hannah and Her Sisters and A Room with a View with three awards, Aliens with two awards, and Artie Shaw: Time Is All You’ve Got, The Assault, Children of a Lesser God, The Color of Money, Down and Out in America, The Fly, A Greek Tragedy, The Mission, Precious Images, Round Midnight, Top Gun, and Women – for America, for the World with one.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Paul NewmanThe Color of Money {“Eddie Felson”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Michael Caine — Hannah and Her Sisters {“Elliot”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Marlee Matlin — Children of a Lesser God {“Sarah”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Dianne Wiest — Hannah and Her Sisters {“Holly”}

ART DIRECTION A Room with a View — Art Direction: Gianni Quaranta, Brian Ackland-Snow; Set Decoration: Brian Savegar, Elio Altamura

CINEMATOGRAPHY The Mission — Chris Menges

COSTUME DESIGN A Room with a View — Jenny Beavan, John Bright

DIRECTING Platoon — Oliver Stone

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Artie Shaw: Time Is All You’ve Got — Brigitte Berman, Producer

[NOTE: A tie. The other winning film in this category was Down and Out in America.]

Down and Out in America — Joseph Feury and Milton Justice, Producers

[NOTE: A tie. The other winning film in this category was Artie Shaw: Time Is All You’ve Got.]

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Women–for America, for the World — Vivienne Verdon-Roe, Producer

FILM EDITING Platoon — Claire Simpson

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM The Assault — The Netherlands

MAKEUP The Fly — Chris Walas, Stephan Dupuis

MUSIC (Original Score) ‘Round Midnight — Herbie Hancock

MUSIC (Original Song) “Take My Breath Away” from Top Gun — Music by Giorgio Moroder; Lyric by Tom Whitlock

BEST PICTURE Platoon — Arnold Kopelson, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) A Greek Tragedy — Linda Van Tulden and Willem Thijssen, Producers

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Precious Images — Chuck Workman, Producer

SOUND Platoon — John K. Wilkinson, Richard Rogers, Charles ‘Bud’ Grenzbach, Simon Kaye

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING Aliens — Don Sharpe

VISUAL EFFECTS Aliens — Robert Skotak, Stan Winston, John Richardson, Suzanne Benson

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) A Room with a View — Ruth Prawer Jhabvala

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Hannah and Her Sisters — Woody Allen

HONORARY AWARD

To Ralph Bellamy for his unique artistry and his distinguished service to the profession of acting.

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Steven Spielberg

 

The Last Emperor

 

60th Academy Awards

The 60th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), took place on April 11, 1988, at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. Actor Chevy Chase hosted the show for the second consecutive year.

As of 2018, this is the most recent Academy Awards ceremony to take place in April.

The Last Emperor won nine awards including Best Picture and Best Director for Bernardo Bertolucci. For their performances in Moonstruck, Cher and Olympia Dukakis won Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress, respectively. Michael Douglas won Best Actor for his role in Wall Street; Sean Connery won Best Supporting Actor for The Untouchables. The telecast garnered 42.2 million viewers in the United States.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Michael Douglas — Wall Street {“Gordon Gekko”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Sean Connery — The Untouchables {“Jim Malone”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE CherMoonstruck {“Loretta Castorini”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Olympia DukakisMoonstruck {“Rose Castorini”}

ART DIRECTION The Last Emperor — Art Direction: Ferdinando Scarfiotti; Set Decoration: Bruno Cesari, Osvaldo Desideri

CINEMATOGRAPHY The Last Emperor — Vittorio Storaro

COSTUME DESIGN The Last Emperor — James Acheson

DIRECTING The Last Emperor — Bernardo Bertolucci

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) The Ten-Year Lunch: The Wit and Legend of the Algonquin Round Table — Aviva Slesin, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Young at Heart — Sue Marx and Pamela Conn, Producers

FILM EDITING The Last Emperor — Gabriella Cristiani

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Babette’s Feast — Denmark

MAKEUP Harry and the Hendersons — Rick Baker

MUSIC (Original Score) The Last Emperor — Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne, Cong Su

MUSIC (Original Song) “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” from Dirty Dancing — Music by Franke Previte, John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz; Lyric by Franke Previte

BEST PICTURE The Last Emperor — Jeremy Thomas, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) The Man Who Planted Trees  — Frédéric Back, Producer

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Ray’s Male Heterosexual Dance Hall — Jonathan Sanger and Jana Sue Memel, Producers

SOUND The Last Emperor — Bill Rowe, Ivan Sharrock

VISUAL EFFECTS Innerspace — Dennis Muren, William George, Harley Jessup, Kenneth Smith

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) The Last Emperor — Mark Peploe, Bernardo Bertolucci

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Moonstruck — John Patrick Shanley

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (Sound Effects Editing) RoboCop — Stephen Flick, John Pospisil

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Billy Wilder

 

Rain Man

© Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

61st Academy Awards

The 61st Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 1988, and took place on Wednesday, March 29, 1989, at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

Rain Man won four awards, including Best Actor for Dustin Hoffman, Best Director for Barry Levinson, and Best Picture. Other winners included Who Framed Roger Rabbit, with three competitive awards (and one Special Achievement Award); Dangerous Liaisons, with three awards; and The Accused, The Accidental Tourist, A Fish Called Wanda, The Appointments of Dennis Jennings, Beetlejuice, Bird, Hôtel Terminus: The Life and Times of Klaus Barbie, The Milagro Beanfield War, Mississippi Burning, Pelle the Conqueror, Tin Toy, Working Girl, and You Don’t Have to Die with one each. The telecast garnered almost 43 million viewers in the United States.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Dustin Hoffman — Rain Man {“Raymond Babbitt”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Kevin Kline — A Fish Called Wanda {“Otto”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Jodie Foster — The Accused {“Sarah Tobias”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Geena Davis — The Accidental Tourist {“Muriel”}

ART DIRECTION Dangerous Liaisons — Art Direction: Stuart Craig; Set Decoration: Gerard James

CINEMATOGRAPHY Mississippi Burning — Peter Biziou

COSTUME DESIGN Dangerous Liaisons — James Acheson

DIRECTING Rain Man — Barry Levinson

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Hotel Terminus: The Life and Times of Klaus Barbie — Marcel Ophuls, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) You Don’t Have to Die — William Guttentag and Malcolm Clarke, Producers

FILM EDITING Who Framed Roger Rabbit — Arthur Schmidt

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Pelle the Conqueror — Denmark

MAKEUP Beetlejuice — Ve Neill, Steve La Porte, Robert Short

MUSIC (Original Score) The Milagro Beanfield War — Dave Grusin

MUSIC (Original Song) “Let The River Run” from Working Girl — Music and Lyric by Carly Simon

BEST PICTURE Rain Man — Mark Johnson, Producer

SHORT FILM (Animated) Tin Toy — John Lasseter, William Reeves

SHORT FILM (Live Action) The Appointments of Dennis Jennings — Dean Parisot, Steven Wright

SOUND Bird — Les Fresholtz, Dick Alexander, Vern Poore, Willie D. Burton

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING Who Framed Roger Rabbit — Charles L. Campbell, Louis L. Edemann

VISUAL EFFECTS Who Framed Roger Rabbit — Ken Ralston, Richard Williams, Edward Jones, George Gibbs

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Dangerous Liaisons — Christopher Hampton

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Rain Man — Screenplay by Ronald Bass, Barry Morrow; Story by Barry Morrow

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

To Richard Williams for the animation direction of Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

HONORARY AWARD

To the National Film Board of Canada in recognition of its 50th anniversary and its dedicated commitment to originate artistic, creative and technological activity and excellence in every area of film making.

To Eastman Kodak Company in recognition of the company’s fundamental contributions to the art of motion pictures during the first century of film history.

 

Driving Miss Daisy

 

62nd Academy Awards

The 62nd Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 1989 and took place on March 26, 1990, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. Actor Billy Crystal hosted the show for the first time. 

Driving Miss Daisy won four awards including Best Picture and Best Actress for Jessica Tandy, the oldest person at the time to win a competitive acting Oscar. Other winners included Glory with three awards, Born on the Fourth of July, The Little Mermaid, and My Left Foot with two, and The Abyss, Balance, Batman, Cinema Paradiso, Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt, Dead Poets Society, Henry V, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, The Johnstown Flood, and Work Experience with one. The telecast garnered more than 40 million viewers in the United States.

Winners

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE Daniel Day Lewis — My Left Foot {“Christy Brown”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Denzel Washington – Glory {“Trip”}

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE Jessica Tandy — Driving Miss Daisy {“Daisy Werthan”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Brenda Fricker — My Left Foot {“Mrs. Brown”}

ART DIRECTION Batman — Art Direction: Anton Furst; Set Decoration: Peter Young

CINEMATOGRAPHY Glory — Freddie Francis

COSTUME DESIGN Henry V — Phyllis Dalton

DIRECTING Born on the Fourth of July — Oliver Stone

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt — Robert Epstein and Bill Couturié, Producers

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) The Johnstown Flood — Charles Guggenheim, Producer

FILM EDITING Born on the Fourth of July  – David Brenner, Joe Hutshing

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Cinema Paradiso — Italy

MAKEUP Driving Miss Daisy  — Manlio Rocchetti, Lynn Barber, Kevin Haney

MUSIC (Original Score) The Little Mermaid — Alan Menken

MUSIC (Original Song) “Under The Sea” from The Little Mermaid — Music by Alan Menken; Lyric by Howard Ashman

BEST PICTURE Driving Miss Daisy — Richard D. Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck, Producers

SHORT FILM (Animated) Balance — Christoph Lauenstein, Wolfgang Lauenstein

SHORT FILM (Live Action) Work Experience — James Hendrie

SOUND Glory — Donald O. Mitchell, Gregg C. Rudloff, Elliot Tyson, Russell Williams II

SOUND EFFECTS EDITING Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade — Ben Burtt, Richard Hymns

VISUAL EFFECTS The Abyss — John Bruno, Dennis Muren, Hoyt Yeatman, Dennis Skotak

WRITING (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium) Driving Miss Daisy — Alfred Uhry

WRITING (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen) Dead Poets Society — Tom Schulman

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Howard W. Koch

HONORARY AWARD

To Akira Kurosawa for accomplishments that have inspired, delighted, enriched and entertained audiences and influenced filmmakers throughout the world.

 

We hope you have enjoyed our Academy Awards series. In another ten years we will add the 1990s look back.

See all the Academy Award Nominees and Winners 1929 - 1987 here.

 

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85 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards

85 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards

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A deluxe, year–by–year chronicle of the Academy Awards, with an entertaining text, hundreds of star–studded photographs, and complete lists of the nominees and winners. 85 Years of the Oscar, newly revised and expanded, is the official history of the Academy Awards. More info →
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