All articles and pages may contain affiliate links. You can read our disclosure policy here. Edward G Robinson

Note: Oscar® and Academy Awards® and Oscar® design mark are the trademarks and service marks and the Oscar© statuette the copyrighted property, of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. This site is neither endorsed by nor affiliated with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

The 1960s was a turbulent time in history and the movies being made reflected those changes.

Historical drama films continued to include epics, in the style of Ben-Hur from 1959, with Cleopatra (1963), but also evolving with 20th-century settings, such as The Guns of Navarone (1961), Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and Doctor Zhivago (1965).

Psychological horror films extended, beyond the stereotypical monster films of Dracula/Frankenstein or Wolfman, to include more twisted films, such as Psycho (1960).

Comedy films became more elaborate, such as The Pink Panther (1963), The President’s Analyst (1967), or A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966). Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) elevated the concept of a comedy-drama, where the subtle comedy conceals the harsher elements of the drama beneath, and Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove (1964) set a new standard for satire by turning a story about nuclear holocaust into a sophisticated black comedy.

Beyond the trench coat and film noir, spy films expanded with worldly settings and hi-tech gadgets, such as the James Bond films Dr. No (1962) or Goldfinger (1964) and Thunderball (1965).

Similar to spy films, the heist or caper film included worldly settings and hi-tech gadgets, as in the original Ocean’s Eleven (1960), Topkapi (1964) or The Thomas Crown Affair (1968).

The spaghetti westerns (made in Italy and Spain), were typified by Clint Eastwood films, such as For a Few Dollars More (1965) or The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966). Several other American and Italian actors were also prominent in such westerns including Lee Van Cleef and Franco Nero.

Science-fiction or fantasy films employed a wider range of special effects, as in the original of The Time Machine (1960) and Mysterious Island (1961), or with animated aliens or mythical creatures, as in the Harryhausen animation for Jason and the Argonauts (1963) and One Million Years B.C. (1966). Some extensive sets were built to simulate alien worlds or zero-gravity chambers, as in space-station and spaceship sets for the epic 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), the psychedelic, space settings for the erotic Barbarella (1968), and with ape-city in the original Planet of the Apes (1968).

Beginning in the middle of the decade due to the start of the cultural revolution and the abolition of the Hays Code, films became increasingly experimental and daring and were taking shape of what was to define the 1970s.

The Apartment

 

33rd Academy Awards

The 33rd Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1960, were held on April 17, 1961, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope. This was the first ceremony to be aired on ABC television, which has aired the Academy Awards ever since (save for the period between 1971 and 1975, when they were aired on NBC for the first time since the previous year.)

The Apartment marked the last black and white film to win Best Picture during the era when use of black and white film was still common, as well as the last until 1993 when Schindler’s List won.

Gary Cooper was selected by the Academy Board of Governors to be the year’s recipient of the Academy Honorary Award “for his many memorable screen performances and the international recognition he, as an individual, has gained for the motion picture industry.” Cooper was too ill to attend the ceremony, though his condition was not publicly disclosed, save for his family and close friends. Naturally, Cooper chose his close friend James Stewart to accept the Honorary Oscar on his behalf. Stewart’s emotional speech hinted that something was seriously wrong, and the next day newspapers ran the headline, “Gary Cooper has cancer.” One month later, on May 13, 1961, six days after his 60th birthday, Cooper died.

Young and rising star Hayley Mills was selected by the Academy Board of Governors to be the year’s recipient of the Academy Juvenile Award for her breakthrough performance in Walt Disney’s production of Pollyanna. Mills became the very last recipient of the award, as the Academy retired the award afterwards. From 1963 onward, juvenile actors can officially compete in competitive acting awards with their adult counterparts.

Despite receiving mixed-to-negative critical reception and poor box office receipts, The Alamo was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Its successful bid for Oscar nominations over such films like Psycho and Spartacus was largely due to intense lobbying by the film’s lead actor, producer, and director John Wayne. The film was also thought to have been denied awards because Academy voters were alienated by an overblown publicity campaign by Wayne, particularly one Variety ad claiming that the film’s cast was praying harder for Chill Wills to win his award than the defenders of the Alamo prayed for their lives before the battle. The ad, placed by Wills, reportedly angered Wayne, who took out an ad of his own deploring Wills’ tastelessness. In response to Wills’ ad, claiming that all the voters were his “Alamo Cousins,” Groucho Marx took out a small ad which simply said, “Dear Mr. Wills, I am delighted to be your cousin, but I voted for Sal Mineo,” (Wills’ rival nominee for Exodus).

Winners

ACTOR Burt LancasterElmer Gantry {“Elmer Gantry”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Peter UstinovSpartacus {“Batiatus”}

ACTRESS Elizabeth TaylorButterfield 8 {“Gloria Wandrous”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Shirley JonesElmer Gantry {“Lulu Bains”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) The Apartment — Art Direction: Alexander Trauner; Set Decoration: Edward G. Boyle

ART DIRECTION (Color) Spartacus — Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, Eric Orbom; Set Decoration: Russell A. Gausman, Julia Heron

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) Sons and Lovers — Freddie Francis

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) Spartacus — Russell Metty

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) The Facts of Life — Edith Head, Edward Stevenson

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) Spartacus — Valles, Bill Thomas

DIRECTING The Apartment — Billy Wilder

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) The Horse with the Flying Tail — Larry Lansburgh, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Giuseppina — James Hill, Producer

FILM EDITING The Apartment — Daniel Mandell

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM The Virgin Spring — Sweden

MUSIC (Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture) Exodus — Ernest Gold

MUSIC (Scoring of a Musical Picture) Song without End (The Story of Franz Liszt) — Morris Stoloff, Harry Sukman

MUSIC (Song) “Never On Sunday” from Never on Sunday — Music and Lyrics by Manos Hadjidakis

BEST MOTION PICTURE The Apartment — Billy Wilder, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) Munro — William L. Snyder, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) Day of the Painter — Ezra R. Baker, Producer

SOUND The Alamo — Samuel Goldwyn Studio Sound Department, Gordon E. Sawyer, Sound Director; and Todd-AO Sound Department, Fred Hynes, Sound Director

SPECIAL EFFECTS The Time Machine — Visual Effects by Gene Warren, Tim Baar

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) Elmer Gantry — Richard Brooks

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) The Apartment — Billy Wilder, I. A. L. Diamond

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Sol Lesser

HONORARY AWARD

To Gary Cooper for his many memorable screen performances and the international recognition he, as an individual, has gained for the motion picture industry.

To Stan Laurel for his creative pioneering in the field of cinema comedy.

To Hayley Mills for Pollyanna, the most outstanding juvenile performance during 1960.

 

Westside Story

 

34th Academy Awards

The 34th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1961, were held on April 9, 1962, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope; this was the seventh time Hope hosted the Oscars.

Legendary filmmaker Federico Fellini received his first Best Director nomination for his film La Dolce Vita, though the movie itself failed to garner a nomination for Best Picture.

Sophia Loren became the first actor or actress to win for an acting Oscar for a non-English-speaking role.

Winners

ACTOR Maximilian SchellJudgment at Nuremberg {“Hans Rolfe”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE George ChakirisWest Side Story {“Bernardo”}

ACTRESS Sophia Loren — Two Women {“Cesira”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Rita MorenoWest Side Story {“Anita”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) The Hustler — Art Direction: Harry Horner; Set Decoration: Gene Callahan

ART DIRECTION (Color) West Side Story — Art Direction: Boris Leven; Set Decoration: Victor A. Gangelin

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) The Hustler — Eugen Shuftan

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) West Side Story — Daniel L. Fapp

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) La Dolce Vita — Piero Gherardi

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) West Side Story — Irene Sharaff

DIRECTING West Side Story — Robert Wise, Jerome Robbins

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Le Ciel et la Boue (Sky Above and Mud Beneath) — Arthur Cohn and Rene Lafuite, Producers

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Project Hope — Frank P. Bibas, Producer

FILM EDITING West Side Story — Thomas Stanford

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Through a Glass Darkly — Sweden

MUSIC (Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture) Breakfast at Tiffany’s — Henry Mancini

MUSIC (Scoring of a Musical Picture) West Side Story — Saul Chaplin, Johnny Green, Sid Ramin, Irwin Kostal

MUSIC (Song) “Moon River” from Breakfast at Tiffany’s — Music by Henry Mancini; Lyrics by Johnny Mercer

BEST MOTION PICTURE West Side Story — Robert Wise, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) Ersatz (The Substitute) — Zagreb Film

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) Seawards the Great Ships — Templar Film Studios

SOUND West Side Story — Todd-AO Sound Department, Fred Hynes, Sound Director; and Samuel Goldwyn Studio Sound Department, Gordon E. Sawyer, Sound Director

SPECIAL EFFECTS The Guns of Navarone — Visual Effects by Bill Warrington; Audible Effects by Vivian C. Greenham

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) Judgment at Nuremberg — Abby Mann

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) Splendor in the Grass — William Inge

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

George Seaton

HONORARY AWARD

To William L. Hendricks for his outstanding patriotic service in the conception, writing and production of the Marine Corps film, A Force in Readiness, which has brought honor to the Academy and the motion picture industry.

To Fred L. Metzler for his dedication and outstanding service to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

To Jerome Robbins for his brilliant achievements in the art of choreography on film.

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Stanley Kramer

 

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

 

35th Academy Awards

The 35th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1962, were held on April 8, 1963, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California, hosted by Frank Sinatra.

Winners

ACTOR Gregory PeckTo Kill a Mockingbird {“Atticus Finch”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Ed BegleySweet Bird of Youth {“Tom ‘Boss’ Finley”}

ACTRESS Anne BancroftThe Miracle Worker {“Annie Sullivan”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Patty DukeThe Miracle Worker {“Helen Keller”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) To Kill a Mockingbird — Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead; Set Decoration: Oliver Emert

ART DIRECTION (Color) Lawrence of Arabia — Art Direction: John Box, John Stoll; Set Decoration: Dario Simoni

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) The Longest Day — Jean Bourgoin, Walter Wottitz, (Henri Persin)

[NOTE: Originally, the three names of Jean Bourgoin, Henri Persin and Walter Wottitz (as listed on the Official Screen Credits form) were announced as nominees for this film in this category. The credits from the film listed four Directors of Photography (in the following order), Mr. Persin, Mr. Wottitz, Pierre Levent and Mr. Bourgoin. The program for the Awards ceremony and even the official letter from Price Waterhouse with the results of the final voting for the awards listed the three names as winners in this category. At some point, the name of Henri Persin was dropped from the nomination, as his name has been “whited-out” from the official wording for the nomination certificates, and the nominations and winners lists the Academy publishes do not include his name. The Academy’s records and files give no reason for this exclusion.]

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) Lawrence of Arabia — Fred A. Young

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? — Norma Koch

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm — Mary Wills

DIRECTING Lawrence of Arabia — David Lean

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Black Fox — Louis Clyde Stoumen, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Dylan Thomas — Jack Howells, Producer

FILM EDITING Lawrence of Arabia — Anne Coates

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Sundays and Cybele — France

MUSIC (Music Score–substantially original) Lawrence of Arabia — Maurice Jarre

MUSIC (Scoring of Music–adaptation or treatment) Meredith Willson’s The Music Man — Ray Heindorf

MUSIC (Song) “Days Of Wine And Roses” from Days of Wine and Roses — Music by Henry Mancini; Lyrics by Johnny Mercer

BEST PICTURE Lawrence of Arabia — Sam Spiegel, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) The Hole – John Hubley and Faith Hubley, Producers

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) Heureux Anniversaire (Happy Anniversary) — Pierre Etaix and J.C. Carrière, Producers

SOUND Lawrence of Arabia — Shepperton Studio Sound Department, John Cox, Sound Director

SPECIAL EFFECTS The Longest Day — Visual Effects by Robert MacDonald; Audible Effects by Jacques Maumont

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) To Kill a Mockingbird — Horton Foote

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) Divorce–Italian Style — Ennio de Concini, Alfredo Giannetti, Pietro Germi

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Steve Broidy

 

Tom Jones

© Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All Rights Reserved.

36th Academy Awards

The 36th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1963, were held on April 13, 1964, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Jack Lemmon.

Best Picture winner Tom Jones became the only film in history to garner three Best Supporting Actress nominations; it also tied the Oscar record of five unsuccessful acting nominations, set by Peyton Place at the 30th Academy Awards.

This year’s winner for Best Actress category was unique. Although playing a supporting role and having a relatively small amount on the screen, Patricia Neal won the Best Actress category for her lead (or supporting) role in Hud. The movie also won for Best Supporting Actor for Melvyn Douglas and Best Cinematography – Black and White. It was the second and, to date, last film to win two acting awards without being nominated for Best Picture (the other being The Miracle Worker).

At age 71 Margaret Rutherford set a then record for the oldest winner for Best Supporting Actress. Coincidentally, the year before Patty Duke set a then record for the youngest winner ever. Rutherford was also only the 2nd Oscar winner to be over the age of 70 at the time of her win. The other was Edmund Gwenn.

This was the only time in the history of the Academy Awards that all Best Supporting Actress nominees were born outside the United States.

This was the first time a black actor won Best Actor, and the first time a winning film (An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge) had been aired on network television before the ceremony.

Sammy Davis Jr. announced the winner in the category scoring of music, adaptation or treatment but was given the envelope with the name of a winner in a different category (score, substantially original).

Best Sound Effects was introduced this year with It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World winning the award.

Winners

ACTOR Sidney PoitierLilies of the Field {“Homer Smith”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Melvyn DouglasHud {“Homer Bannon”}

ACTRESS Patricia NealHud {“Alma”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Margaret RutherfordThe V.I.P.s {“Duchess of Brighton”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) America America — Gene Callahan

ART DIRECTION (Color) Cleopatra — Art Direction: John DeCuir, Jack Martin Smith, Hilyard Brown, Herman Blumenthal, Elven Webb, Maurice Pelling, Boris Juraga; Set Decoration: Walter M. Scott, Paul S. Fox, Ray Moyer

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) Hud — James Wong Howe

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) Cleopatra — Leon Shamroy

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) Federico Fellini’s 8-1/2 — Piero Gherardi

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) Cleopatra — Irene Sharaff, Vittorio Nino Novarese, Renie

DIRECTING Tom Jones — Tony Richardson

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Robert Frost: A Lover’s Quarrel with the World — Robert Hughes, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Chagall — Simon Schiffrin, Producer

FILM EDITING How the West Was Won — Harold F. Kress

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Federico Fellini’s 8-1/2 — Italy

MUSIC (Music Score–substantially original) Tom Jones — John Addison

MUSIC (Scoring of Music–adaptation or treatment) Irma La Douce — Andre Previn

MUSIC (Song) “Call Me Irresponsible” from Papa’s Delicate Condition — Music by James Van Heusen; Lyrics by Sammy Cahn

BEST PICTURE Tom Jones — Tony Richardson, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) The Critic — Ernest Pintoff, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge — Paul de Roubaix and Marcel Ichac, Producers

SOUND How the West Was Won — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio Sound Department, Franklin E. Milton, Sound Director

SOUND EFFECTS It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World Walter G. Elliott

SPECIAL EFFECTS Cleopatra — Emil Kosa, Jr.

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) Tom Jones — John Osborne

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) How the West Was Won — James R. Webb

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Sam Spiegel

 

My Fair Lady

© 1964 Warner Bros. Pictures

37th Academy Awards

The 37th Academy Awards honored film achievements of 1964. For the first time, an award was presented in the field of makeup. None of the four acting awards went to American actors, something not repeated until the 80th Academy Awards were awarded for 2007.

The Best Picture winner of 1964, director George Cukor’s My Fair Lady, was about the transformative training of a rough-speaking flower girl into a lady. The musical had run for many years on the stage (in both NYC and London). Audrey Hepburn, the female lead of the film, was controversially not nominated for Best Actress. The unpopularity of her replacement of Julie Andrews – the stage actress from the original play (and coincidentally the Best Actress winner of the year) – as well as the revelation that the majority of her singing performance was dubbed by Marni Nixon (which wasn’t approved of by Hepburn herself) were seen as the main reasons for the snub.

The producer of the ceremony was MGM film producer Joe Pasternak. The master of ceremonies was Bob Hope making it his 14th time hosting the show. The awards show was star-studded with many top celebrities participating, including an appearance by Judy Garland, who sang a medley of Cole Porter songs in tribute to the composer, who died in October 1964.

This year marked the only time in Oscar history where 3 films got 12 or more nominations. Becket and My Fair Lady both with 12 nominations and Mary Poppins with 13. This marked the first year since the inception of the Supporting Actor and Actress categories wherein the acting Oscars were all won by non-American actors. This feat would again later be repeated at the 80th Academy Awards ceremony in 2008.

Winners

ACTOR Rex HarrisonMy Fair Lady {“Professor Henry Higgins”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Peter UstinovTopkapi {“Arthur Simpson”}

ACTRESS Julie AndrewsMary Poppins {“Mary Poppins”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Lila KedrovaZorba the Greek {“Madame Hortense”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) Zorba the Greek — Vassilis Fotopoulos

ART DIRECTION (Color) My Fair Lady — Art Direction: Gene Allen, Cecil Beaton; Set Decoration: George James Hopkins

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) Zorba the Greek — Walter Lassally

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) My Fair Lady — Harry Stradling

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) The Night of the Iguana — Dorothy Jeakins

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) My Fair Lady — Cecil Beaton

DIRECTING My Fair Lady — George Cukor

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Jacques-Yves Cousteau’s World without Sun — Jacques-Yves Cousteau, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Nine from Little Rock — Charles Guggenheim, Producer

FILM EDITING Mary Poppins — Cotton Warburton

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow — Italy

MUSIC (Music Score–substantially original) Mary Poppins — Richard M. Sherman, Robert B. Sherman

MUSIC (Scoring of Music–adaptation or treatment) My Fair Lady — Andre Previn

MUSIC (Song) “Chim Chim Cher-ee” from Mary Poppins — Music and Lyrics by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman

BEST PICTURE My Fair Lady — Jack L. Warner, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) The Pink Phink — David H. DePatie and Friz Freleng, Producers

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) Casals Conducts: 1964 — Edward Schreiber, Producer

SOUND My Fair Lady — Warner Bros. Studio Sound Department, George R. Groves, Sound Director

SOUND EFFECTS Goldfinger — Norman Wanstall

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Mary Poppins — Peter Ellenshaw, Eustace Lycett, Hamilton Luske

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) Becket — Edward Anhalt

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) Father Goose — Story by S. H. Barnett; Screenplay by Peter Stone, Frank Tarloff

HONORARY AWARD

To William Tuttle for his outstanding make-up achievement for 7 Faces of Dr. Lao.

 

Sound of Music

© 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment. All rights reserved.

 

38th Academy Awards

The 38th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1965, were held on April 18, 1966, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope.

The ceremony was broadcast on the ABC network and was the first to be broadcast live in color.

The two most nominated films were The Sound of Music and Doctor Zhivago, each with ten nominations and five wins. The winner of Best Picture was 20th Century Fox’s and Robert Wise’s The Sound of Music, adapted from the Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway musical. Both movies are in the top 10 inflation-adjusted commercially successful films ever made, and both would appear 33 years later on the American Film Institute list of the greatest American films of the twentieth century.

The Sound of Music was the first Best Picture winner without a writing nomination since Hamlet; it would be the last until Titanic at the 70th Academy Awards. Othello became the third film (of four to date) to receive four acting nominations without one for Best Picture.

Lynda Bird Johnson, daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson, attended the Academy Awards presentation and was escorted by actor George Hamilton.

Winners

ACTOR  Lee MarvinCat Ballou {“Kid Shelleen/Tim Strawn”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Martin BalsamA Thousand Clowns {“Arnold Burns”}

ACTRESS Julie ChristieDarling {“Diana Scott”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Shelley WintersA Patch of Blue {“Rose-Ann D’Arcey”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) Ship of Fools — Art Direction: Robert Clatworthy; Set Decoration: Joseph Kish

ART DIRECTION (Color) Doctor Zhivago — Art Direction: John Box, Terry Marsh; Set Decoration: Dario Simoni

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) Ship of Fools — Ernest Laszlo

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) Doctor Zhivago — Freddie Young

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) Darling — Julie Harris

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) Doctor Zhivago — Phyllis Dalton

DIRECTING The Sound of Music — Robert Wise

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) The Eleanor Roosevelt Story — Sidney Glazier, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) To Be Alive! — Francis Thompson, Producer

FILM EDITING The Sound of Music — William Reynolds

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM The Shop on Main Street — Czechoslovakia

MUSIC (Music Score–substantially original) Doctor Zhivago — Maurice Jarre

MUSIC (Scoring of Music–adaptation or treatment) The Sound of Music — Irwin Kostal

MUSIC (Song) “The Shadow Of Your Smile” from The Sandpiper — Music by Johnny Mandel; Lyrics by Paul Francis Webster

BEST PICTURE The Sound of Music — Robert Wise, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) The Dot and the Line — Chuck Jones and Les Goldman, Producers

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) The Chicken (Le Poulet) — Claude Berri, Producer

SOUND The Sound of Music — 20th Century-Fox Studio Sound Department, James P. Corcoran, Sound Director; and Todd-AO Sound Department, Fred Hynes, Sound Director

SOUND EFFECTS The Great Race — Tregoweth Brown

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Thunderball — John Stears

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) Doctor Zhivago — Robert Bolt

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) Darling — Frederic Raphael

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Edmond L. DePatie

HONORARY AWARD

To Bob Hope for unique and distinguished service to our industry and the Academy.

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

William Wyler

 

Man For All Seasons

© 1966 – Highland Films. – All Rights Reserved

 

39th Academy Awards

The 39th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1966, were held on April 10, 1967, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope.

Only two of the Best Picture nominees also had nominations for Best Director; Fred Zinnemann’s lavish and thoughtful biopic A Man for All Seasons and Mike Nichols’ bold and taboo-breaking drama Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. Both were adaptations of stage dramas.

Winners

ACTOR Paul ScofieldA Man for All Seasons {“Sir Thomas More”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Walter Matthau — The Fortune Cookie {“Willie Gingrich”}

ACTRESS Elizabeth TaylorWho’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? {“Martha”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Sandy Dennis — Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? {“Honey”}

ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White) Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? — Art Direction: Richard Sylbert; Set Decoration: George James Hopkins

ART DIRECTION (Color) Fantastic Voyage — Art Direction: Jack Martin Smith, Dale Hennesy; Set Decoration: Walter M. Scott, Stuart A. Reiss

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White) Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? — Haskell Wexler

CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color) A Man for All Seasons — Ted Moore

COSTUME DESIGN (Black-and-White) Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? — Irene Sharaff

COSTUME DESIGN (Color) A Man for All Seasons — Elizabeth Haffenden, Joan Bridge

DIRECTING A Man for All Seasons — Fred Zinnemann

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) The War Game — Peter Watkins, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) A Year toward Tomorrow — Edmond A. Levy, Producer

FILM EDITING Grand Prix — Fredric Steinkamp, Henry Berman, Stewart Linder, Frank Santillo

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM A Man and a Woman — France

MUSIC (Original Music Score) Born Free — John Barry

MUSIC (Scoring of Music–adaptation or treatment) A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

Ken Thorne

MUSIC (Song) “Born Free” from Born Free — Music by John Barry; Lyrics by Don Black

BEST PICTURE A Man for All Seasons — Fred Zinnemann, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass Double Feature — John Hubley and Faith Hubley, Producers

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) Wild Wings — Edgar Anstey, Producer

SOUND Grand Prix — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio Sound Department, Franklin E. Milton, Sound Director

SOUND EFFECTS Grand Prix — Gordon Daniel

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Fantastic Voyage — Art Cruickshank

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) A Man for All Seasons — Robert Bolt

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) A Man and a Woman — Story by Claude Lelouch; Screenplay by Claude Lelouch, Pierre Uytterhoeven

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

George Bagnall

HONORARY AWARD

To Y. Frank Freeman for unusual and outstanding service to the Academy during his thirty years in Hollywood.

To Yakima Canutt for achievements as a stunt man and for developing safety devices to protect stunt men everywhere.

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Robert Wise

 

Image from the movie "In the Heat of the Night"

© 1967 United Artists − All right reserved.

40th Academy Awards

The 40th Academy Awards honored film achievements of 1967. Originally scheduled for April 8, 1968, the awards were postponed to two days later, April 10, 1968, because of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.. Bob Hope was once again the host of the ceremony.

Due to the increasing rarity of black and white feature films, the awards for cinematography, art direction and costume design were combined into single categories rather than a distinction between color and monochrome. The Best Picture nominees were an eclectic group of films reflecting the chaos of their era. The event was the first one since the 1948 awards show to feature film clips from the Best Picture nominated films.

This year’s nominations also marked the first time that three different films were nominated for the “Top Five” Academy Awards: Best Picture, Director, Actor, Actress and Screenplay. The three films were Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner. However, the winner of Best Picture was producer Walter Mirisch and director Norman Jewison’s thriller/mystery film, In the Heat of the Night (with seven nominations and five wins – Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Screenplay, Best Film Editing and Best Sound).

The Graduate is, as of the 88th Academy Awards, the last film to win Best Director and nothing else.

Due to an all-out push by Academy President Gregory Peck, 18 of the 20 acting nominees were present at the ceremony. Only Katharine Hepburn and the late Spencer Tracy, who was nominated posthumously, were missing.

Winners

ACTOR Rod Steiger In the Heat of the Night {“Police Chief Bill Gillespie”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE George KennedyCool Hand Luke {“Dragline”}

ACTRESS Katharine HepburnGuess Who’s Coming to Dinner {“Christina Drayton”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Estelle ParsonsBonnie and Clyde {“Blanche Barrow”}

ART DIRECTION Camelot — Art Direction: John Truscott, Edward Carrere; Set Decoration: John W. Brown

CINEMATOGRAPHY Bonnie and Clyde — Burnett Guffey

COSTUME DESIGN Camelot — John Truscott

DIRECTING The Graduate — Mike Nichols

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) The Anderson Platoon — Pierre Schoendoerffer, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) The Redwoods — Mark Harris and Trevor Greenwood, Producers

FILM EDITING In the Heat of the Night — Hal Ashby

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Closely Watched Trains — Czechoslovakia

MUSIC (Original Music Score) Thoroughly Modern Millie — Elmer Bernstein

MUSIC (Scoring of Music–adaptation or treatment) Camelot — Alfred Newman, Ken Darby

MUSIC (Song) “Talk To The Animals” from Doctor Dolittle — Music and Lyrics by Leslie Bricusse

BEST PICTURE In the Heat of the Night — Walter Mirisch, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) The Box — Fred Wolf, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) A Place to Stand — Christopher Chapman, Producer

SOUND In the Heat of the Night — Samuel Goldwyn Studio Sound Department

SOUND EFFECTS The Dirty Dozen — John Poyner

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Doctor Dolittle — L. B. Abbott

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) In the Heat of the Night — Stirling Silliphant

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner — William Rose

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Gregory Peck

HONORARY AWARD

To Arthur Freed for distinguished service to the Academy and the production of six top-rated Awards telecasts.

IRVING G. THALBERG MEMORIAL AWARD

Alfred Hitchcock

 

Oliver!

© 1968, renewed 1996 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

41st Academy Awards

The 41st Academy Awards were presented on April 14, 1969, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. It was the first Academy Awards ceremony to be staged at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. For the first time since the 11th Academy Awards, there was no host.

Oliver! became the first—and so far, the onlyG-rated film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. By contrast, the following year would see the only X-rated film to win Best Picture, Midnight Cowboy. Oliver! would also be the last British film to win Best Picture until Chariots of Fire in 1982 and the last movie musical to win until Chicago in 2003 (though others have been nominated between 1969 and 2003: Hello, Dolly!, Fiddler on the Roof, Cabaret, All That Jazz, Beauty and the Beast, and Moulin Rouge!).

The year was notable for the firstand so far, onlytie for Best Actress (or any female acting category). Katharine Hepburn in The Lion in Winter and Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl shared the award. Hepburn also became the second actress and third performer overall to win an acting Oscar two years in a row, after Luise Rainer in 1936 (The Great Ziegfeld) and 1937 (The Good Earth), and Spencer Tracy in 1937 (Captains Courageous) and 1938 (Boys Town). The previous year, Hepburn had won Best Actress for Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.

As the special effects director and designer for 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick was the recipient of the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects this year. It was the only Oscar he would ever win.

Cliff Robertson‘s performance in Charly was met with a generally mixed reception from critics and audiences. When he won the Academy Award for Best Actor, it engendered some controversy: less than two weeks after the ceremony, TIME mentioned the Academy’s generalized concerns over “excessive and vulgar solicitation of votes” and said “many members agreed that Robertson’s award was based more on promotion than on performance.”

At the ceremony, Young Americans was announced as the Documentary Feature winner. On May 7, 1969, the film was disqualified because it had played in October 1967, thus making it ineligible for a 1968 award. Journey Into Self, the first runner-up, was awarded the Oscar on May 8, 1969.

Controversy was created on Oscar night when Johnny Carson and Buddy Hackett announced in a sketch on the evening’s Tonight Show, which was recorded three hours before the awards ceremony, that Oliver! would be the winner for Best Picture and that Jack Albertson would win for Best Supporting Actor. Columnist Frances Drake claimed that most observers believed Carson and Hackett “were playing a huge practical joke or happened to make a lucky guess.” As Carson recalled it on the air years later, it created a huge controversy and people at Price Waterhouse were fired. Referring to it as “The Great Carson Hoax,” PricewaterhouseCoopers stated in a 2004 press release that it was “later proven that Carson and Hackett made a few lucky guesses for their routine, dispelling rumors of a security breach and keeping the integrity of the balloting process intact.” The Academy later hired Carson five times to host the ceremony.

Winners

ACTOR Cliff Robertson – Charly {“Charly Gordon”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Jack AlbertsonThe Subject Was Roses {“John Cleary”}

ACTRESS Katharine HepburnThe Lion in Winter {“Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine”}

[NOTE: A tie. The other winner in this category was Barbra Streisand (Funny Girl).]

Barbra StreisandFunny Girl {“Fanny Brice”}

[NOTE: A tie. The other winner in this category was Katharine Hepburn (The Lion in Winter).]

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Ruth GordonRosemary’s Baby {“Minnie Castevet”}

ART DIRECTION Oliver! — Art Direction: John Box, Terence Marsh; Set Decoration: Vernon Dixon, Ken Muggleston

CINEMATOGRAPHY Romeo and Juliet — Pasqualino De Santis

COSTUME DESIGN Romeo and Juliet — Danilo Donati

DIRECTING Oliver! — Carol Reed

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Journey into Self — Bill McGaw, Producer

[NOTE: At the 41st Awards ceremony on April 14, 1969, Young Americans was announced as the winner of the Documentary Feature Oscar. On May 7, 1969, the film was declared ineligible after it was revealed that the film had played in October of 1967, therefore ineligible for a 1968 Award. The first runner-up, Journey into Self, was awarded the statuette on May 8, 1969.]

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Why Man Creates — Saul Bass, Producer

FILM EDITING Bullitt — Frank P. Keller

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM War and Peace — Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

MUSIC (Original Score–for a motion picture [not a musical]) The Lion in Winter — John Barry

MUSIC (Score of a Musical Picture–original or adaptation) Oliver! — Adaptation score by John Green

MUSIC (Song–Original for the Picture) “The Windmills Of Your Mind” from The Thomas Crown Affair —

Music by Michel Legrand; Lyrics by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman

BEST PICTURE Oliver! — John Woolf, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day — Walt Disney, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) Robert Kennedy Remembered — Charles Guggenheim, Producer

SOUND Oliver! — Shepperton Studio Sound Department

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS 2001: A Space Odyssey — Stanley Kubrick

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) The Lion in Winter — James Goldman

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–written directly for the screen) The Producers — Mel Brooks

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

Martha Raye

HONORARY AWARD

To John Chambers for his outstanding makeup achievement for Planet of the Apes.

To Onna White for her outstanding choreography achievement for Oliver!

 

Midnight Cowboy

© Courtesy Everett Collection

42nd Academy Awards

The 42nd Academy Awards were presented April 7, 1970, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. There was no host. This was the first Academy Awards ceremony to be broadcast via satellite to an international audience, but only outside North America. Mexico and Brazil were the sole countries to broadcast the event live.

This is currently the highest rated of the televised Academy Awards ceremonies, according to Nielsen ratings. The record, as of 2017, remains unbroken thanks to the emergence of the Super Bowl as the biggest annual event of awards season.

Midnight Cowboy became the first – and so far, the only – X-rated film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Its rating has since been downgraded to R. The previous year had seen the only G-rated film to win Best Picture, Carol Reed’s Oliver!.

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? set an Oscar record by receiving nine nominations without one for Best Picture.

This was the last time until the 68th Academy Awards wherein none of the four acting winners had appeared in Best Picture nominees, as well as the first time where every acting nomination, as well as every major nominated film, was in color.

Winners

ACTOR John WayneTrue Grit {“Rooster Cogburn”}

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Gig Young — They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? {“Rocky”}

ACTRESS Maggie Smith — The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie {“Miss Jean Brodie”}

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE Goldie HawnCactus Flower {“Toni Simmons”}

ART DIRECTION Hello, Dolly! — Art Direction: John DeCuir, Jack Martin Smith, Herman Blumenthal; Set Decoration: Walter M. Scott, George Hopkins, Raphael Bretton

CINEMATOGRAPHY Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid — Conrad Hall

COSTUME DESIGN Anne of the Thousand Days — Margaret Furse

DIRECTING Midnight Cowboy — John Schlesinger

DOCUMENTARY (Feature) Arthur Rubinstein – The Love of Life — Bernard Chevry, Producer

DOCUMENTARY (Short Subject) Czechoslovakia 1968 — Denis Sanders and Robert M. Fresco, Producers

FILM EDITING Z — Françoise Bonnot

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM Z — Algeria

MUSIC (Original Score–for a motion picture [not a musical]) Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid — Burt Bacharach

MUSIC (Score of a Musical Picture–original or adaptation) Hello, Dolly! — Adaptation score by Lennie Hayton and Lionel Newman

MUSIC (Song–Original for the Picture) “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ On My Head” from Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid — Music by Burt Bacharach; Lyrics by Hal David

BEST PICTURE Midnight Cowboy — Jerome Hellman, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon) It’s Tough to Be a Bird — Ward Kimball, Producer

SHORT SUBJECT (Live Action) The Magic Machines — Joan Keller Stern, Producer

SOUND Hello, Dolly! — Jack Solomon, Murray Spivack

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS Marooned — Robbie Robertson

WRITING (Screenplay–based on material from another medium) Midnight Cowboy — Waldo Salt

WRITING (Story and Screenplay–based on material not previously published or produced) Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid — William Goldman

JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

George Jessel

HONORARY AWARD

To Cary Grant for his unique mastery of the art of screen acting with the respect and affection of his colleagues.

 

 

Next week we look at the Academy Awards in the 1970s.

 

See all the Academy Award Nominees and Winners 1929 - 1987 here.

 

Academy Award History Series

Late 20s | 1930s | 1939 | 1940s | 1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s

Academy Awards Books in Our Bookstore

85 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards

85 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards

Author:
Genres: Movies, Reference
A deluxe, year–by–year chronicle of the Academy Awards, with an entertaining text, hundreds of star–studded photographs, and complete lists of the nominees and winners. 85 Years of the Oscar, newly revised and expanded, is the official history of the Academy Awards. More info →
Buy from Amazon
Buy from Barnes and Noble