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Paul Newman

A screen legend, superstar, and the man with the most famous blue eyes in movie history.

Paul Newman

Filmography

1954      

The Silver Chalice

 

1956      

Somebody Up There Likes Me

The Rack

 

1957      

The Helen Morgan Story

Until They Sail

 

1958      

The Long, Hot Summer

The Left Handed Gun

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Rally ‘Round the Flag, Boys!

 

1959      

The Young Philadelphians

 

1960      

From the Terrace

Exodus

 

1961      

The Hustler

Paris Blues

 

1962      

Sweet Bird of Youth

Hemingway’s Adventures of a Young Man

 

1963      

Hud

A New Kind of Love

The Prize

 

1964      

What a Way to Go!

The Outrage

 

1965      

Lady L

 

1966      

Harper

Torn Curtain

 

1967      

Hombre

Cool Hand Luke

 

1968      

The Secret War of Harry Frigg

 

1969      

Winning

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

 

1970      

WUSA

 

1972      

Pocket Money

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean

 

1973      

The Mackintosh Man

The Sting

 

1974      

The Towering Inferno

 

1975      

The Drowning Pool

 

1976      

Silent Movie

Buffalo Bill and the Indians

 

1977      

Slap Shot

 

1979      

Quintet

 

1980      

When Time Ran Out…

 

1981      

Fort Apache, The Bronx

Absence of Malice

 

1982      

Come Along with Me

The Verdict

 

1984      

Harry & Son

 

1986      

The Color of Money

 

1989      

Fat Man and Little Boy

Blaze

 

1990      

Mr. and Mrs. Bridge

 

1993      

La Classe américaine

 

1994      

The Hudsucker Proxy

Nobody’s Fool

 

1998      

Twilight

 

1999

Message in a Bottle

 

2000      

Where the Money Is

 

2002      

Road to Perdition

 

2003      

Our Town

 

2005      

Empire Falls

Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D

 

2006      

Cars

Mater and the Ghost Light

 

2007      

Dale

 

2008      

The Meerkats

 

2017      

Cars 3

Awards

Paul Newman was nominated for ten competitive Academy Awards and won one. Seven in the category of Best Actor in a Leading Role:

One for Best Picture Rachel, Rachel (1968) (as producer) and one Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Road to Perdition (2002).

In 1986, he received an honorary Academy Award “In recognition of his many and memorable and compelling screen performances and for his personal integrity and dedication to his craft. ” Paul Newman was not present at the awards ceremony. He gave his acceptance speech via satellite from Chicago.

In 1994, he received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.

 

The embarrassing thing is that my salad dressing is out-grossing my films. ~ Paul Newman 

Paul Newman was born Paul Leonard Newman on January 26, 1925, in Shaker Heights, Ohio, the second son of Theresa Garth (née Fetzer, died 1982) and Arthur Sigmund Newman (died 1950), who ran a sporting goods store. Newman’s mother worked in his father’s store, while raising Paul and his elder brother, Arthur, who later became a producer and production manager.

Newman showed an early interest in the theater; his first role was at the age of seven, playing the court jester in a school production of Robin Hood. At age 10, Newman performed at the Cleveland Play House in a production of Saint George and the Dragon, and was a notable actor and alumnus of their Curtain Pullers children’s theatre program. Graduating from Shaker Heights High School in 1943, he briefly attended Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, where he was initiated into the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity.

Newman served in the United States Navy in World War II in the Pacific theater. Initially, he enrolled in the Navy V-12 pilot training program at Yale University, but was dropped when his colorblindness was discovered.

Boot camp followed, with training as a radioman and rear gunner. Qualifying in torpedo bombers in 1944, Aviation Radioman Third Class Newman was sent to Barbers Point, Hawaii. He was subsequently assigned to Pacific-based replacement torpedo squadrons VT-98, VT-99, and VT-100, responsible primarily for training replacement combat pilots and air crewmen, with special emphasis on carrier landings.

After the war, Newman completed his Bachelor of Arts in drama and economics at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio in 1949. Shortly after earning his degree, he joined several summer stock companies, most notably the Belfry Players in Wisconsin and the Woodstock Players in Illinois. He toured with them for three months and developed his talents as a part of Woodstock Players. He later attended the Yale School of Drama for one year, before moving to New York City to study under Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio.

Newman arrived in New York City in 1951 with his first wife, Jackie Witte, taking up residence in the St. George section of Staten Island.

He made his Broadway theatre debut in the original production of William Inge’s Picnic with Kim Stanley in 1953 and appeared in the original Broadway production of The Desperate Hours in 1955. In 1959, he was in the original Broadway production of Sweet Bird of Youth with Geraldine Page and three years later starred with Page in the film version. During this time Newman started acting in television. His first credited role was in a 1952 episode of Tales of Tomorrow entitled “Ice from Space”. In the mid-1950s, he appeared twice on CBS’s Appointment with Adventure anthology series.

In February 1954, Newman appeared in a screen test with James Dean, directed by Gjon Mili, for East of Eden (1955). Newman was tested for the role of Aron Trask, Dean for the role of Aron’s fraternal twin brother Cal. Dean won his part, but Newman lost out to Richard Davalos. That same year, he co-starred with Eva Marie Saint and Frank Sinatra in a live—and color—television broadcast of Our Town, a musical adaptation of Thornton Wilder’s stage play. Newman was a last-minute replacement for James Dean. The Dean connection had resonance two other times, as Newman was cast in two leading roles originally earmarked for Dean, as Billy the Kid in The Left Handed Gun and as Rocky Graziano in Somebody Up There Likes Me, both filmed after Dean’s death in an automobile collision.

Newman’s first film for Hollywood was The Silver Chalice (1954). The film was a box office failure and the actor would later acknowledge his disdain for it. In 1956, Newman garnered much attention and acclaim for the role of Rocky Graziano in Somebody Up There Likes Me. In 1958, he starred in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), opposite Elizabeth Taylor. The film was a box office smash and Newman garnered his first Academy Award nomination. Also in 1958, Newman starred in The Long, Hot Summer with Joanne Woodward, with whom he reconnected on the