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Mary Astor

Best remembered for her role as Brigid O’Shaughnessy in The Maltese Falcon and as the mother in Meet Me In St Louis.

Filmography

1920      

The Scarecrow

 

1921      

Wings of the Border

The Beggar Maid

My Lady o’ the Pines

Sentimental Tommy

Brother of the Bear

The Bashful Suitor

Bullets or Ballots

 

1922      

The Rapids

The Man Who Played God

Hope

John Smith

The Young Painter

The Angelus

 

1923      

To the Ladies

Woman-Proof

The Marriage Maker

Puritan Passions

The Bright Shawl

Success

Hollywood

Second Fiddle

 

1924      

Inez from Hollywood

The Price of a Party

Unguarded Women

The Fighting American

Beau Brummel

The Fighting Coward

 

1925      

Scarlet Saint

The Pace That Thrills

Don Q Son of Zorro

Playing with Souls

Enticement

Oh Doctor!

 

1926      

Forever After

Don Juan

The Wise Guy

High Steppers

 

1927      

No Place to Go

The Rough Riders

Rose of the Golden West

Two Arabian Knights

The Sunset Derby

The Sea Tiger

 

1928      

Romance of the Underworld

Dry Martini

Heart to Heart

Three-Ring Marriage

Dressed to Kill

Sailors’ Wives

 

1929      

The Woman from Hell

New Year’s Eve

 

1930      

The Lash

Holiday

Ladies Love Brutes

The Runaway Bride

 

1931      

Smart Woman

White Shoulders

The Sin Ship

Behind Office Doors

Other Men’s Women

The Royal Bed

Men of Chance

 

1932      

Red Dust

A Successful Calamity

Those We Love

The Lost Squadron

 

1933      

Convention City

The World Changes

The Kennel Murder Case

Jennie Gerhardt

The Little Giant

 

1934      

I Am a Thief

The Case of the Howling Dog

The Man with Two Faces

Return of the Terror

Upper World

Easy to Love

 

1935      

Man of Iron

Red Hot Tires

Page Miss Glory

Dinky

Straight from the Heart

Lady from Nowhere

 

1936      

Dodsworth

Trapped by Television

And So They Were Married

The Murder of Dr. Harrigan

 

1937      

The Hurricane

The Prisoner of Zenda

 

1938      

Listen, Darling

Woman Against Woman

There’s Always a Woman

Paradise for Three

No Time to Marry

 

1939      

Midnight

 

1940      

Brigham Young

Turnabout

 

1941      

The Maltese Falcon

The Great Lie

 

1942      

The Palm Beach Story

Across the Pacific

 

1943      

Thousands Cheer

Young Ideas

 

1944      

Blonde Fever

Meet Me in St. Louis

 

1946      

Claudia and David

 

1947      

Cass Timberlane

Cynthia

Desert Fury

Fiesta

 

1948      

Act of Violence

 

1949      

Any Number Can Play

Little Women

 

1956      

The Power and the Prize

A Kiss Before Dying

 

1957      

The Devil’s Hairpin

 

1958      

This Happy Feeling

 

1959      

A Stranger in My Arms

 

1961      

Return to Peyton Place

 

1964      

Youngblood Hawke

Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte

Awards

Mary Astor was nominated for and won Best Actress in a Supporting Role Academy Award for The Great Lie (1941)

Once you start asking questions, innocence is gone. ~ Mary Astor
 

Mary Astor was born Lucile Vasconcellos Langhanke  on May 3, 1906 in Quincy, Illinois. She was the only child of Otto Ludwig and Helen Marie de Vasconcellos. Both of her parents were teachers. Astor’s father taught German at Quincy High School until the U.S. entered World War I. Later, he took up light farming. Astor’s mother, who had always wanted to be an actress, taught drama and elocution. Astor was home-schooled in academics and was taught to play the piano by her father, who insisted she practice daily. Her piano talents came in handy when she played piano in her films The Great Lie and Meet Me in St. Louis.

In 1919, Astor sent a photograph of herself to a beauty contest in Motion Picture Magazine, becoming a semifinalist. When Astor was 15, the family moved to Chicago, Illinois, with her father teaching German in public schools. Astor took drama lessons and appeared in various amateur stage productions. The following year, she sent another photograph to Motion Picture Magazine, this time becoming a finalist and then runner-up in the national contest. Her father then moved the family to New York City, so his daughter could act in motion pictures. He managed her affairs from September 1920 to June 1930.

A Manhattan photographer, Charles Albin, saw her photograph and asked the young girl with haunting eyes and long auburn hair, whose nickname was “Rusty”, to pose for him. The Albin photographs were seen by Harry Durant of Famous Players-Lasky and Astor was signed to a six-month contract with Paramount Pictures. Her name was changed to “