Filmography

1914      

The Heroine of Mons

 

1917      

The Happy Warrior

 

1919      

The Lackey and the Lady

Bookworms

Five Pounds Reward

 

1930      

Outward Bound

 

1931      

Five and Ten

Devotion

A Free Soul

Never the Twain Shall Meet

 

1932      

Service for Ladies

Smilin’ Through

The Animal Kingdom

 

1933      

Berkeley Square

Captured!

Secrets

 

1934      

British Agent

The Lady Is Willing

Of Human Bondage

 

1935      

The Scarlet Pimpernel

 

1936      

The Petrified Forest

Romeo and Juliet

 

1937      

Stand-In

It’s Love I’m After

 

1938      

Pygmalion

 

1939      

Intermezzo

Gone with the Wind

 

1941      

“Pimpernel” Smith

Common Heritage

49th Parallel

From the Four Corners

The White Eagle

 

1942      

In Which We Serve

The First of the Few

 

1943      

War in the Mediterranean

The Gentle Sex

The Lamp Still Burns

Awards

He was nominated for two Best Actor in a Leading Role Academy Awards

1934 – Berkeley Square

1939 – Pygmalion 

 

What the actor is in private life, he is to a large extent on the stage, because he cannot conceal himself and his true personality from his audience. ~ Leslie Howard

Learn more about Leslie Howard, review his filmography and more

Actors, Biographies

Leslie Howard Stainer was born in London, to Lilian (Blumberg) and Ferdinand “Frank” Steiner. Leslie went to Dulwich College. After school, he worked as a bank clerk until the outbreak of World War I, when he went into the army. In 1917, diagnosed as shell-shocked, he was invalided out and advised to take up acting as therapy. In a few years, his name was famous on the stages of London and New York.

He made his first movie in 1914, The Heroine of Mons. He became known as the perfect Englishman (slim, tall, intellectual and sensitive), a part that he played in many movies, and a part women would dream about. His first sound movie came in 1930, Outward Bound, an adaptation of the stage play in which he starred. In Never the Twain Shall Meet (1931) and Smilin’ Through (1932), he played the Englishman role to the hilt. His screen persona could perhaps best be summed up by his role as Sir Percy Blakeney in The Scarlet Pimpernel (1934), a foppish member of society.

As he became more successful, he also became picky about which roles he would do, and usually performed in only two films a year. In 1939, he played the character that will always be associated with him, that of Ashley Wilkes, the honor-bound disillusioned intellectual Southern gentleman in Gone with the Wind (1939).

However, war clouds were gathering over England, and he devoted all his energy on behalf of the war effort. He directed films, wrote articles and made radio broadcasts. He died in 1943, when the KLM plane he was in was shot down by German fighters over the Bay of Biscay.