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James Stewart

Best know for his roles in It’s A Wonderful Life, Rear Window and The Philadelphia Story.

 

 

Filmography

1935

The Murder Man

 

1936

Rose Marie

Next Time We Love

Wife vs. Secretary

Small Town Girl

Speed

The Gorgeous Hussy

Born to Dance

After the Thin Man

 

1937

Seventh Heaven

The Last Gangster

Navy Blue and Gold

 

1938

Of Human Hearts

Vivacious Lady

The Shopworn Angel

You Can’t Take It With You

 

1939

Made for Each Other

The Ice Follies of 1939

It’s a Wonderful World

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Destry Rides Again

 

1940

The Shop Around the Corner

The Mortal Storm

No Time for Comedy

The Philadelphia Story

 

1941

Come Live with Me

Pot o’ Gold

Ziegfeld Girl

 

1946

It’s a Wonderful Life

 

1947

Magic Town

 

1948

Call Northside 777

On Our Merry Way

Rope

You Gotta Stay Happy

 

1949

The Stratton Story

Malaya

 

1950

Winchester ’73

Broken Arrow

Harvey

The Jackpot

 

1951

No Highway in the Sky

 

1952

The Greatest Show on Earth

Bend of the River

Carbine Williams

 

1953

The Naked Spur

Thunder Bay

 

1954

The Glenn Miller Story

The Far Country

Rear Window

 

1955

The Man from Laramie

Strategic Air Command

 

1956

The Man Who Knew Too Much

 

1957

The Spirit of St. Louis

Night Passage

 

1958

Vertigo

Bell, Book and Candle

 

1959

Anatomy of a Murder

The FBI Story

 

1960

The Mountain Road

 

1961

Two Rode Together

 

1962

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation

How the West Was Won

 

1963

Take Her, She’s Mine

 

1964

Cheyenne Autumn

 

1965

Dear Brigitte

Shenandoah

The Flight of the Phoenix

 

1966

The Rare Breed

 

1968

Firecreek

Bandolero!

 

1970

The Cheyenne Social Club

 

1971

Fools’ Parade

 

1976

The Shootist

 

1977

Airport ’77

 

1978

The Big Sleep

The Magic of Lassie

 

1991

An American Tail: Fievel Goes West

Awards

Stewart was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one in competition for The Philadelphia Story (1940), and received an Academy Lifetime Achievement award in 1985.

When it came to kissing, Harlow was the best.  ~ James Stewart

James Stewart was born on May 20, 1908, in Indiana, Pennsylvania. He attended Mercersburg Academy prep school, graduating in 1928.

A shy child, Stewart spent much of his after-school time in the basement working on model airplanes, mechanical drawing and chemistry—all with a dream of going into aviation. However, he abandoned visions of being a pilot when his father insisted that instead of the United States Naval Academy he attend Princeton University. Stewart enrolled at Princeton in 1928 as a member of the class of 1932. He excelled at studying architecture, so impressing his professors with his thesis on an airport design that he was awarded a scholarship for graduate studies; but he gradually became attracted to the school’s drama and music clubs.

His acting and accordion talents at Princeton led him to be invited to the University Players, an intercollegiate summer stock company in West Falmouth, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. Stewart performed in bit parts in the Players’ productions in Cape Cod during the summer of 1932, after he graduated.

The troupe had previously included Henry Fonda and Margaret Sullavan. Stewart and Fonda became close friends over the summer of 1932 when they shared an apartment with Joshua Logan and Myron McCormick. When Stewart came to New York at the end of the summer stock season, which had included the Broadway tryout of Goodbye Again, he shared an apartment with Fonda, who had by then finalized his divorce from Sullavan.

Stewart debuted on Broadway in the brief run of Carry Nation and a few weeks as a chauffeur in the comedy Goodbye Again, in which he had two lines

By 1934, he was given more substantial stage roles, including the modest hit Page Miss Glory and his first dramatic stage role in Sidney Howard’s Yellow Jack, which convinced him to continue his acting career. However, Stewart and Fonda, still roommates, were both struggling. In the fall of 1934, Fonda’s success in The Farmer Takes a Wife took him to Hollywood. Finally, Stewart attracted the interest of MGM scout Bill Grady who saw Stewart on the opening night of Divided by Three, a glittering première with many luminaries in attendance, including Irving Berlin, Moss Hart and Fonda, who had returned to New York for the show. With Fonda’s encouragement, Stewart agreed to take a screen test, after which he signed a contract with MGM in April 1935, as a contract player for up to seven years at $350 a week.

James Stewart and Jean Harlow in Wife vs. Secretary