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Ingrid Bergman

Best remembered for her roles as Ilsa Lund in Casablanca (1942), and as Alicia Huberman in Notorious (1946), an Alfred Hitchcock thriller also starring Cary Grant and Claude Rains

Filmography

1932      

Landskamp

 

1935      

Munkbrogreven

Bränningar

Swedenhielms

Valborgsmässoafton

 

1936      

På solsidan

Intermezzo

 

1938      

Dollar

Die Vier Gesellen

En kvinnas ansikte

 

1939      

En enda natt

Intermezzo: A Love Story

 

1940      

Juninatten

 

1941      

Adam Had Four Sons

Rage in Heaven

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

 

1942      

Casablanca

 

1943      

For Whom the Bell Tolls

Swedes in America

 

1944      

Gaslight

 

1945      

Spellbound

Saratoga Trunk

The Bells of St. Mary’s

 

1946      

American Creed

Notorious

 

1948      

Arch of Triumph

Joan of Arc

 

1949      

Under Capricorn

 

1950      

Stromboli, terra di Dio

 

1952      

Europa ’51

 

1953      

Siamo donne

 

1954      

Viaggio in Italia

La Paura

Giovanna d’Arco al rogo

 

1956      

Elena et les hommes

Anastasia

 

1958      

Indiscreet

The Inn of the Sixth Happiness

 

1961      

Aimez-Vous Brahms?

Auguste

 

1964      

The Visit

The Yellow Rolls-Royce

 

1967      

Stimulantia

 

1969      

Cactus Flower

 

1970      

Henri Langlois

A Walk in the Spring Rain

 

1973      

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

 

1974      

Murder on the Orient Express

 

1976      

A Matter of Time

 

1978      

Höstsonaten

Awards

Ingrid Bergman won three Academy Awards for acting, two for Best Actress; Gaslight (1944), and Anastasia (1956); and one for Best Supporting Actress, Murder on the Orient Express (1974).

She was also nominated for Best Actress Academy Awards for For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945), Joan of Arc (1948), and Höstsonaten (1978).

I have no regrets. I wouldn’t have lived my life the way I did if I was going to worry about what people were going to say. ~Ingrid Bergman

Ingrid Bergman, named after Princess Ingrid of Sweden, was born on August 29, 1915 in Stockholm, to a Swedish father, Justus Samuel Bergman and his German wife, Friedel Henrietta Augusta Louise (née Adler) Bergman.

When she was two years old, her mother died. Her father, who was an artist and photographer, died when she was 13. In the years before he died, he wanted her to become an opera star, and had her take voice lessons for three years. But she always knew she wanted to be an actress.

Later, she received a scholarship to the state-sponsored Royal Dramatic Theatre School, where Greta Garbo had some years earlier earned a similar scholarship. After several months, she was given a part in a new play, Ett Brott (A Crime), written by Sigfrid Siwertz. Chandler notes that this was “totally against procedure” at the school, where girls were expected to complete three years of study before getting such acting roles.

During her first summer break, she was also hired by a Swedish film studio, which led to her leaving the Royal Dramatic Theatre after just one year, to work in films full-time. Her first film role after leaving the Royal Dramatic Theatre was a small part in Munkbrogreven (1935), although she reportedly had previously been an extra in the 1932 film Landskamp). She went on to act in a dozen films in Sweden, including En kvinnas ansikte, which was later remade as A Woman’s Face with Joan Crawford, and one film in Germany, Die vier Gesellen (The Four Companions) (1938).